Saturday, November 19, 2016

Saturday, November 12, 2016

For Veterans' Day, a remembrance in a diary

For Veterans’ Day weekend, part of a 1916 poem by Robert W. Service, whose brother was killed in World War I.
       Ima Hogg copied this into her summer 1918 diary.

The Fool---Service

“But it isn’t playing the game,” he said--
And he slammed his books away.
“The Latin & Greek I’ve got in my head
Will do for a duller day.”
“Rubbish!” I cried,
            “The bugle’s call
Isn’t for lads from school.”
D’ye think he’d listen?
Oh not at all:
So I called him a fool, a fool.
Now there’s his dog, by
            his empty bed.
And the flute he used to play.
And his favorite bat--
But Dick he’s dead--
Somewhere in France
            they say


Ima Hogg was mourning someone she lost in that war in 1918. We may never know who.

Saturday, October 15, 2016

Summer 1910: A Visit to Warwick Castle

      Ima and Mike continue their travels in England. She, like the Earl of Warwick, was not rich--but she kept track of every shilling on this trip. 

      Ima, the future collector and creator of a museum, had an eye for antique furniture as early as 1910. 

Left Oxford Wednesday [August 10, 1910]  2:15 P.M.
Arrived Warwick 3:30


       Dale’s Temperance Hotel (Excellent Rooms 2/3/--Cab 1/6 (Could take train) Meals delicious & moderate). I had a room here, in the Annex--a quaint, old house. The bed and the other furniture was of magnificent solid mahogany, of that clear light colored wood so rare in our country. 

       We went through the castle grounds and the castle. The guide told us that the Earl and Countess would return the next day with an immense party (100 he said) so the castle would be closed to visitors. I later learned that these two live very extravagantly and are not rich, either. I suppose five shillings which comes with every visitor helps a little!



Saturday, September 24, 2016

Summer travels, 1910, and another mystery

Left London Aug. 8 Monday, 2:30.
Arrived Windsor by train (Paddington) 3:20 PM. White Hart rooms 5/ 6 meals most expensive and an air of graft which irritated me. --Viewed the castle and very imposing grounds.
Left Tuesday at 2:30 P.M. for steam boat trip on the Thames--to Henly--arrived 7:15 P.M.
This trip is decidedly not to be missed--
The beautiful homes and the estate of Astor--Cliveden--are a sight perhaps no where else to be seen in just in such a state of symmetrical beauty. The flowers particularly were so profuse and gay in color on the perfect lawns.

Arrived in Oxford 9:45 P.M.
Mike and I both cold and head-aching. And here was the evil-charm, the land which I shall not mention, as I hope to forget such a place exists. No--I do not for it was an event I shall likely never see in such another similar sphere.
[written in the margin of this page:
 “The Light of the World” H.H. Hunt
Keble College  Glorious masterpiece]

What was the “evil-charm”?  What “event”?

Will we ever know?

Saturday, September 10, 2016

Ima's 1910 Adventures in England, continued.

Left Canterbury Thursday  [Aug. 4, 1910] 2:20
       Arrived London 5:20 P.M.
       Drove (2/6) to Torrington Sq. where we found board (6/6) no lunch--clean rooms, nice people, poor food. In London we did the usual things. This time I enjoyed Temple Courts (Middle Temple), Wallace Collection, Kensington Museum, Cheshire Cheese Inn, walk through Fleet Street, Hampton Court boat at 4:30 to Richmond--walk up to the hill--gorgeous never to be forgotten view with sunset, and a fine dinner. Home by train and subway. At the Japanese-British Exhibit we saw the Japanese wrestlers, a great novelty and a strange thing, too.
       Heard Tetrazzini at Opera in Barber of Seville. Saw “Priscilla Runs Away” Wilson-Terry (charming)--“The Whip”--thrilling melodrama, but goodl.
        Am sorry I didn’t start this sooner for now I am trying to catch up and can not feel like taking time to tell the things which I have felt most important. Here’s one thing, we are seeing the life of the people--as upon the Thames, where were the house-boats, etc. as I did not before.
       The week of Cricket at Canterbury--National Festival--We went down Thursday. A wonderful sight and experience it was; throngs of enthusiasts who were self contained--, a brilliant sight on the velvety big area of green. A most scientific game is cricket but a very unexciting performance, I think.

We don't know what Ima's brother Mike thought. 


Saturday, August 27, 2016

A visit to Canterbury, summer 1910


Ima and her brother Mike continue their travels in England. 


Left Bruges 2:10 for Ostend      
       Sailed for Dover 3:30 arrived 6 P.M.
       
Arrived Canterbury Wednesday [August 3] 9:30 P.M.
       Hotel Statler’s Temperance 6 shil[lings] pension, A very good, unpretentious place. The Cathedral, the close, and the ruins behind the cathedral make a very impressive whole. This cathedral is a transition example of perpendicular Gothic and with the Norman influence. The raised choir is exceptional and very lovely. I shall never forget the view from Mercery Lane, from the corner where it is said the Inn stood at which the Canterbury Pilgrims halted--(Chaucer). I found Canterbury well worth a long stay. We had here an interesting walk along High Street.
       Soldiers--passed in long procession on bicycle--and fresh wholesome boys in characteristic school costume filled the street as it was commencement day at the fine preparatory school here.

And then, on to London--umbrella-less? 

       

Saturday, August 20, 2016

Ima's & Mike's Summer Travels, 1910: Umbrella # 4.

Left Brussels Tuesday [Aug. 2] 4:15 P.M.
   
       Arrived Bruges  6:25 P.M.

       Hotel du Londres 3.50 Fr.[francs] a bed, Table de Hote meals, excellent and moderate prices. We had a little walk after dinner.       

       The next morning [Wednesday Aug. 3] we continued our walk through the old streets, and over the canals, enjoying the same quaint Gothic houses, the picturesque views at every crooked turn. The Belfry, the many churches and cathedrals give a beautiful outline to the roofs of the little town. We went to the Hospital St. John where I again marveled at the exquisite workmanship and the beauty of Meurling’s pictures: The Legend of St. Ursula, Adoration of the Magi, and the Marriage of St. Catherine, etc. Mike, too, enjoyed these pictures as no others he has seen I think, with perhaps the exception of some in the Tate Gallery in London.  
      
Umbrella No. 4.

To lose three umbrellas is unfortunate; to lose four is "extremely careless"!